Academic SEM Strategy: Sustainability

Michael G. Dolence & Associates, Volume 2015, Number 4

Innovation in Higher Education Newsletter

Academic Strategies will determine enrollment success and the future sustainability of Higher Education because curriculum drives enrollment, enrollment drives revenue and revenue drives everything else.

CDE

 

Consider…

The Postsecondary Education Conundrum

“Postsecondary education in the United States faces a conundrum: Can we preserve access, help students learn more and finish their degrees sooner and more often, while keeping college affordable for families, all at the same time? And can the higher education reforms currently most in vogue—expanding the use of technology and making colleges more accountable—help us do these things?”—The Brookings Institution, June 5, 2013, written by Cecilia Elena Rouse

 

 

Academic Strategies, at a minimum, must achieve four primary objectives:

  • They must be built upon a curriculum architecture that is optimized for sustainability.
  • They must result in curricula that are current, competitive, engaging, cohesive, and of value.
  • They must optimize the emerging Global Digital Learning Ecosystem.
  • They must result in curricula that thrive in a highly competitive market being both affordable and compelling.

Explore MGDA Higher Education Blog

The new Global Digital Learning Ecosystem Paradigm continues to evolve and shape the future of Higher Education.

Here are some prime examples:

  • The Global Freshman Academy EdX and Arizona State University, two leaders in interactive online education, announce the Global Freshman Academy, a first-of-its-kind program that offers a unique entry point to an undergraduate degree.
  • The $7K Masters in Computer Science. Georgia Tech’s new OMSCS in partnership with Udacity and ATT is a great example of optimizing the emerging global digital learning ecosystem.
  • The $20K iMBA. The UIUC iMBA, expected to launch in 2016, priced at $20,000 (est.). This digital curriculum architecture is designed to serve learners in a MBA degree program of study, as well as, individuals seeking advanced practice standing in seven contemporary business communities of practice. [Coursera iMBA page]

Developing and using Academic SEM Strategies.

Here arre some examples of what we mean when we sugest contemproary Academic SEM Strategies.

  • Develop Curriculum around a new proficiency based curriculum architecture by embedding Certifications into Community of Practice Based Programs of Study.
  • Develop Program based Positioning Strategies as a way to revitalize existing curricula and develop a fresh narrative to position Programs of Study in the market.
  • Assess strategic value of existing Programs of Study and use the information to create a value narrative.
  • Evaluate academic strategic assets and use the information to develop new high market value curricula.
  • There are three months until launch of the 2015 Recruitment Season for Fall 2016 enrollments. Time to fine tune plans, polish strategies, test systems, pre test everything and begin social media pre campaign activities.
  • It is also time for contingency planning and Academic SEM strategising for Fall 2015 academic intitiatives, Academic Master Plan review and revision, and comprehensive review of any curriculum development projects underway.

Caution: Do not waste the calendar, it moves quickly and when it runs out, all efforts jump one year into the future. Do not get distracted by quick fixes and misguided underinformed silly ideas that have no hope of yield.

  • Take care that a bottom feeding mandate doesn’t hamstring the 2016 campaign by distracting attention from the critical planning and setup work.
  • Time to plan a 2016 ‘Bump Strategy” is now.

Academic SEM

Learn why all “Strategic” Enrollment Management is “Academic,” attend:

Academic SEM Posters Available

Academic SEM Funnel [MGDA01]

SEM-Poster-512

Academic SEM Cycles [MGDA02]

SEM-Cycle-Poster-512

images[3]

 

 

 

 

Academic SEM Strategy: 80% of admissions directors concerned about meeting enrollment goals!

Michael G. Dolence & Associates, Volume 2015, Number 3

Innovation in Higher Education Newsletter

May 1, 2015 is only days away. It is time to reflect on what we learned last October from the prospect of persistent enrollment challenges and decline. We must anticipate our actions as the May 1 milestone hurdles us toward Fall 2015 enrollment and the fiscal and educational reality that follows. Explore MGDA Higher Education Blog.

According to Inside Higher Ed’s Survey of College and University Admissions Directors Fall 2014

The survey released September 18, 2014 reported:

  • 61% of colleges did not make enrollment numbers and nearly 80% of admissions directors reported being moderately or very concerned about meeting enrollment goals.
  • 71% of private bachelor’s institutions didn’t meet goals by May 1, 2014 (up from 59% in 2013).
  • 32% of all institutions – in violation of NACAC’s principles of good practice – recruited students after May 1 who had committed to other institutions (up from 29% in 2013).
Table 1: Estimated National Enrollment by Sector (Title IV, Degree-Granting Institutions)
FALL 2014 FALL 2013 FALL 2012
Sector Enrollment % Change from Prior Year Enrollment % Change from Prior Year Enrollment % Change from Prior Year
Total Enrollment, All Sectors 19,619,773 -1.3% 19,885,203 -1.5% 20,195,924 -1.8%
Four-Year, Public 7,965,176 0.0% 7,964,090 0.4% 7,931,702 -0.2%
Four-Year, Private Nonprofit 3,823,465 1.6% 3,761,953 1.3% 3,714,967 0.5%
Four-Year, For-Profit 1,315,167 -0.4% 1,321,107 -9.7% 1,463,097 -7.2%
Two-Year, Public 6,107,337 -3.5% 6,329,631 -3.3% 6,544,820 -3.6%
Unduplicated Student Headcount (all sectors) 19,258,730 -1.3% 19,511,518 -1.4% 19,791,149 -1.7%

Figure 1: Term to term comparison of estimated enrollment by sector 2012 to 2014

WP-CT-Fall14-chart1-900x361

Source of Table 1 and Figure 1: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center| REPORT: Current Term Enrollment Report – Fall 2014

What did respondents plan to do? According to the Inside Higher Ed survey they planned to increase efforts to recruit:

  • Part-time undergraduates (40% Public / 15% Private)
  • First generation students (71% Public / 50% Private)
  • “Full pay” students (35% Public / 57% Private)
  • Veterans and military (70% Public / 42% Private)

Rather than implement a narrow cluster of ideas, differentiate by using Academic SEM Strategies.

  • Understand academic strategic advantages and how to recognize, develop and showcase them.
  • Understand the dynamics of the emerging global digital learning ecosystem and its impact on the future of education.
  • Develop an academic narrative that differentiates. Ensure your plan delivers a balanced short-term (bump), medium-term (program market revitalization), and long-term strategic position approach. Then live the plan.
  • Invest in increasing the value of your student’s educational experience, and that means curriculum.
  • Recognize that the underlying issues that created such tense market dynamics defy quick marketing, branding, slap together program fixes. Doesn’t mean marketing and branding are not important, they are, but it does mean success requires much more than billboards on freeways, placards on buses, going on-line, and hastily copying others curricular portfolio.
  • Recognize it takes an Academic/SEM Team to achieve a competitive strategic position in the dynamic learners market that is today and tomorrow.
  • Recognize the gift of ‘bump’ strategies that provide a short term increase in enrollments and the precious investment dollars they provide to continue meaningful transformation.
  • There is much more to Academic SEM…

So, what can be done NOW?

  • Starting with minning the mission, and re-conceptualizing your Strategic Plan as ‘Curriculum-Centered’ and the Curriculum as ‘Learner Centered,’ then focus on strategic position. How? Use the Curriculum-Centered Strategic Planning Model (CCSPM) and the SRS Method as reference. This is not a long drawn out effort, it starts with evaluating the existing strategic plan and assets and creating short-term market wins. In the process identify opportunities for program market revitalization and develop a strategic market narrative.
  • Use Academics, Programs of Study, Curricular Elements, Research, and learner experiences to create a compelling narrative that builds competitive strategic position.
  • Use the emerging principles and practices of Academic SEM to enhance your strategic market position by developing a long term, sustainable strategy.
  • Use bump tactics to gain in selected areas in order to fund broader innovation and revitalization and pave the pathway to a strategic market position. Make everything count toward the future.
  • There are numerous ways and methods to begin an Academic SEM approach to sustainability. The following links provide options, information and opportunities.

Evolve to Academic SEM

Learn why all “Strategic” Enrollment Management is “Academic,” attend:

Academic SEM Posters Available

Academic SEM Funnel [MGDA01]

SEM-Poster-512

Academic SEM Cycles [MGDA02]

SEM-Cycle-Poster-512

images[3]